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4.

Game Concepts

4.1.
Players
4.1.1.
The player which is currently playing his turn is called the active player.
4.1.2.
The notion of opposing player or opponent is relative. For a given player, any other player that isn’t currently on his team is both an opposing player and an opponent. In a duel game, 1 vs 1, each player is the only member of his team.
4.2.
Game Pieces
4.2.1.
A game piece is a physical object in the arena: Krosmaster, Summon, Scenery or Kama.
4.2.2.
A Krosmaster is represented in the arena by a figurine and by an associated reference card with a Level.
4.2.3.
A Summon is usually brought to the game by a Krosmaster, is represented by a token whose characteristics are printed on the back, and does not have a Level. The token may be replaced by an actual figurine of the Summon. In that case, the figurine has the same characteristics as the token.
4.2.4.
A Scenery item is represented in the arena by cardboard pieces as provided in the Krosmaster Arena box, which may be replaced by approved 3D resin pieces.
4.2.5.
A Kama is a cardboard token without characteristic, which may be replaced by a metal version.
4.3.
Units
4.3.1.
All Game pieces controlled by a player are called Units.
4.3.2.
A Unit is defined by 3 different criterions; a unit always have a value for each of those 3 criterions.
4.3.3.
A unit is either a Krosmaster or a summon. It’s necessarily one or the other and never both.
4.3.3.a.
A Krosmaster is chosen when you are putting together your team and has a Level on their character card.
4.3.3.b.
A summon is put into play during the game, the more often by a Krosmaster. It doesn’t posses a Level.
4.3.4.
A unit is either Character or mechanism. It’s necessarily one or the other and never both.
4.3.4.a.
Any unit that possesses a MP characteristic is a character.
4.3.4.b.
Any unit that doesn’t possesses an MP characteristic is a mechanism.
If a unit has a dash instead of a numerical value in its MP characteristic, then it doesn’t have an MP characteristic.
4.3.5.
A unit is either ally or opposing. It’s necessarily one or the other and never both.
4.3.5.a.
This criterion is subjective. In a game with two players, a unit who’s an ally to a player will be an opposing unit for its opponent.
4.3.5.b.
Any unit that a player put into play whether by placing his team or by using the capacity of an allied unit is an allied unit.
4.4.
Allies
4.4.1.
If a Spell or Power refers to a Unit, it refers to a Unit in the same Team as the Unit with the Spell or Power, including the latter.
4.4.2.
If a Spell or Power refers to “other” Allied Unit, or “his” Allied Unit, it refers to Unitsin the same Team as the Unitwith the Spell or Power, excluding the latter.
4.4.3.
If a Spell or Power refers to an Ally, it refers to a Unit in the same Team as the Unitwith the Spell or Power, including the latter.
4.4.4.
If a Spell or Power refers to “other” Allies, or “his” Allies, it refers to Unit in the same Team as the Unit with the Spell or Power, excluding the latter.
4.5.
Kamas
4.5.1.
Kamas are the currency of Krosmaster Arena. Each player has a stock of Kamas that is shared between all the Krosmasters in his team.
Kamas earned go in this stock, and Kamas are spent from the common stock.
4.5.2.
Kama tokens have no HP and have the Power Unfazed, which makes them indestructible game pieces. On the ground, they can only be picked up by Krosmasters.
4.5.3.
A player may spend his Kamas to buy GG or Demonic Rewards. A player cannot buy GG or Demonic Rewards he cannot afford.
4.6.
Gallons of Glory
4.6.1.
The Gallons of Glory, or GG, are used to determine the winner of a game. Each player starts with a predefined number of GG, and the winner is the last player to have at least one GG. In addition to these GG a "wild GG" is placed on the side of the arena.
4.6.2.
When a Krosmaster is KO’ed, the opposing player wins a number of GG equal to the Level of that character. If the wild GG is still on the side of the game board, the opponent starts by taking the wild GG. He then steals the missing GG from his opponent.
4.6.3.
Once per player's turn, a Krosmaster present on a Demon cell can buy a GG by spending 1 AP, and paying 12 Kamas from its stock to the reserve. The player then steals 1GG from his opponent, or the wild GG if it still present instead.
4.7.
Demonic Rewards
4.7.1.
Demonic Rewards used in tournament are those found in the KROSMASTER ARENA 2.0 starter box. It is possible to use their equivalent given in tournament kits. If you only have access to the original KROSMASTER ARENA starter box, please consult the 8.1 rule.
4.7.10.
A Krosmaster may reveal a Boost, a Buff or an Equipment anytime during his Activation Phase, if and only if he did not already reveal a Demonic Reward token during his Krosmaster’s turn. This action does not cost any AP. The Demonic Reward is flipped face up and its effect is applied immediately.
4.7.10.a.
Revealing a Demonic Reward is not considered as casting a Spell.
4.7.11.
There are six types of Equipment: Weapons, Sets, Pets, Dofus, Trophies and Techniques
4.7.11.a.
A Krosmaster can only have one face up Equipment of each type on his card (with the exception of Techniques).
4.7.11.b.
If a Krosmaster already owns an Equipment of a given type, he cannot reveal another one of the same type. The type of the Equipment is indicated by a pictogram printed on the Demonic Reward token.
4.7.11.c.
A Krosmaster can have either one Dofus or one Trophy, but not both a Dofus and a Trophy.
4.7.11.d.
Techniques are a special kind of Equipment. Once revealed, they don’t count for the number of DR on the Krosmaster owning it. It is possible to activate multiple Techniques on the same Krosmaster.

Example : A Level 1 Krosmaster that already has a revealed Technique is considered as not having DR on it. It is possible to give it a new DR despite the limitation due to its level, but it is also possible to activate a second Technique.

4.7.11.e.
Each revealed Technique modifies the Punch Spell of the Krosmaster owning it by adding an additional Spell effect.
4.7.11.f.
Each revealed Technique reduces the AP cost of the Punch spell for the Krosmaster owning it by 1 AP, down to a minimum of 0 AP.
4.7.12.
Revealed or not, a Demonic Reward token can never leave the Krosmaster it was allocated to, and is removed from the game with the Krosmater when he is KO’d. Only Boost and Buff tokens are discarded once their effect is over. It is not possible to discard an Equipment to reveal another one of the same type.
4.7.2.
Demonic Rewards are sometimes called «​DR»​.
4.7.3.
Demonic Rewards are placed on the side of the game board at the start the game as described in 1.3.7.
4.7.4.
When setting up the game, all the Demonic Rewards tokens are placed face down. During his first turn, the first player can only buy a DR randomly. At the beginning of the next player’s turn, a DR of each rank is revealed. At the end of his turn, a second DR of each rank is revealed then placed face up next to the matching pile (you can’t choose a pile that was already revealed). This is repeated until each pile has a revealed DR next to it.
4.7.5.
There are three types of Demonic Rewards: Boosts, Buffs and Equipment.
4.7.5.a.
A Boost is an instant advantage. The Demonic Reward has a Black background. Once the Demonic Reward is revealed, the Boost token is consumed: it provides its advantage to the Krosmaster who uses it, and then it is removed from the game.
If a boost gives access to a spell, this spell must be used before any other spell, otherwise it’s lost.
If a boost gives a bonus to a spell, this bonus is consumed on the next spell cast, even if this spell doesn’t benefit from the bonus.
In both cases, at the end of the Krosmaster’s turn, if no spell was cast after the Boost’s activation, its advantage is lost.
4.7.5.b.
A Buff is a temporary improvement. The Demonic Reward has a Brown background. When a Krosmaster uses a Buff, the Demonic Reward token is turned face up on his character card: the Krosmaster then benefits from the effect of the Buff until the beginning of its next turn. At the start of the Krosmaster’s next turn, during the Preliminary Phase, the Buff token is removed from the game.
4.7.5.c.
An Equipment is a continuous improvement. The Demonic Reward has a White background. It takes effect when the Demonic Reward token is turned face up, and stays in place until the end of the game. If the Equipment provides a bonus to AP or MP, the value of the corresponding characteristics is increased. If the Equipment provide a Range bonus, the Range of all his Spells that aren’t fixed (green icon) are increased. This gain is effective as soon as the Equipment token is turned face up. It therefore allows the Krosmaster to spend the additional AP or MP during the turn when the Equipment is revealed.
4.7.6.
A Krosmaster present on a Demon cell can buy a face up or face down Demonic Reward by spending 1AP and paying Kamas from its stock to the reserve. The price of the Demonic Reward varies according to its rank:
  • A GRANITE Demonic Reward costs 3 Kamas.
  • A JADE Demonic Reward costs 6 Kamas.
  • A SILVER Demonic Reward costs 9 Kamas.
4.7.7.
When a Demonic Reward is bought face up, the first Demonic Reward from the corresponding stack is immediately turned face up to replace the Demonic Reward that has just been bought, before the purchased Demonic Reward is allocated to a Krosmaster.
4.7.8.
Once the Demonic Reward token is bought and the next Demonic Reward from the corresponding stack is revealed if necessary (if the Demonic Reward was bought face up), the active player allocates the Demonic Reward to any legal Krosmaster in his Team (the one who bought the Demonic Reward or another one), whether or not that Krosmaster is on a Demon cell.
4.7.8.a.
If the Demonic Reward is bought face down, the player may consult it before allocating it.
4.7.8.b.
The Demonic Reward token is allocated face down. A face down Demonic Reward has no impact on the game. A player may consult the face down Demonic Rewards allocated to his Krosmasters at all times.
4.7.9.
A Krosmaster may not receive more Demonic Rewards than his Level.
A Krosmaster that has already received an amount of Demonic Rewards equal to his Level may not receive any additional Demonic Reward.
4.7.9.a.
A Krosmaster who bought a Demonic Reward but can’t allocate it due to lack of available space on his team’s Krosmasters reveal it and then discards it.
4.8.
Spells
4.8.1.
A cost modification apply even if the modified value is not present in the initial spell cost.

Example : If Arthur Bine is adjacent to an opposing Shak Shaka, the cost of his spell Stowage is 2 MP and 1 AP even if there wasn’t an AP value in the spell cost of Stowage.

4.8.2.
If a spell has in its cost an AP icon with a dash instead of a numerical value, then the spell cost is not alterable.

Exemple : The spell cost of bomb’s spell «Explosion » can’t be altered.

4.8.3.
A Spell whose Name is printed on a Black background has no usage limit, as long as the character can pay for the Spell costs. A Spell whose Name is printed on a Blue background may only be used once per turn. A Spell whose Name is printed on a Purple background may only be used once per turn and per target (it may be cast multiple times a turn as long as its targets are each time different). A Spell whose name is printed on a Red background may only be used once per game.

Example: Goultard The Barbarian’s Black Steam Spell can be used once per turn. His Dark Cloud Spell can be used once per game.

4.8.4.
Once a Spell whose name is printed in red has been cast, when the Spell is entirely resolved, it is no longer considered to be printed on the Krosmaster’s profile.
4.8.5.
Each Krosmaster has a Punch Spell that is not printed on his character’s card. Punch may only be used once per turn and must be cast on an adjacent target (Close Combat Spell). Punch costs 5AP and deals 1 Neutral Damage, with no additional effect.
4.8.6.
Each spell can be classified as either “Attack spell”, “Healing spell” or “Special spell”. In addition, any spell can be further classified as a Summoning spell.
4.8.6.a.
An Attack spell inflicts Damage. It can be identified by the background color of its disk: Blue, Green, Orange, Purple or Grey.
4.8.6.b.
A Healing spell does not inflict Damage, but heal Injuries. It can be identified by the pink color of its disk.
4.8.6.c.
A Special spell doesn’t inflict Damage, nor heal Injuries. It can be identified by the white color of its disk.
4.8.6.d.
A Summoning spell can be identified by a number between brackets following its name.
4.9.
Powers
4.9.1.
A unit that already possesses a power doesn’t gain additional powers with same name.
4.9.10.
Resistance FIRE
4.9.10.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece is the target of a FIRE Attack Spell, during Step 6 of the Spellcasting procedure, Damage inflicted by the FIRE Spell to this Game Piece are decreased by 1”.
4.9.11.
Resistance WATER AIR EARTH FIRE
4.9.11.a.
This Power means: “This Game Piece has all 4 Resistance WATER, Resistance AIR, Resistance EARTH and Resistance FIRE Powers”.
4.9.12.
Immune
4.9.12.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece is the target of a WATER, AIR, EARTH or FIRE Spell, during Step 6 of the Spellcasting procedure, Damage inflicted by the WATER, AIR, EARTH or FIRE Spell to this Game Piece are reduced to 0”. See 6.2.7.
4.9.13.
Itty-Bitty
4.9.13.a.
This Power means: “This Game Piece is not affected by the Block rules”.
4.9.14.
Obstructive
4.9.14.a.
This Power means: “This Game Piece blocks Lines of sight.”
4.9.15.
Counter
4.9.15.a.
This Power means: “During opponent’s turn, if an opposing Unit inflicts one or more Injuries to the Unit owning this power, then this opposing Unit suffers one Injury.”
4.9.16.
Heal
4.9.16.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece casts a Healing Spell, during Step 6 of the Spellcasting procedure, the amount of Injuries Healed by the Healing Spell are increased by 1”.
4.9.17.
Unfazed
4.9.17.a.
This power means: “A Spell or Power that doesn’t belong to this Game Piece cannot apply an effect that will move this Game Piece.”

Example: Theo can teleport himself with “Group Transfer”.
However, he will not teleport an adjacent Unfazed ally.

4.9.18.
Interior Fire
4.9.18.a.
This power only has an effect when playing with Frigost special rules.
4.9.19.
Retribution X
4.9.19.a.
This Power means: “Powers or Additional Effects written after this keyword are only applied if at least X Allied or opposing Avengers are in the arena”.
4.9.2.
Some powers are not explained on the Krosmaster Card, or on the summon token. Their effects are explained below.
4.9.20.
Revenge X
4.9.20.a.
This Power means: “Powers or Additional Effects written after this keyword are only applied if at least X Allied or opposing Villains are in the arena”.
4.9.21.
Chance
4.9.21.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece casts a WATER Spell, during Step 4 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Critical Hit. When this Game Piece is the target of a WATER Attack Spell, during Step 5 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Armour”.
4.9.22.
Agility
4.9.22.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece casts an AIR Spell, during Step 4 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Critical Hit. When this Game Piece is the target of an AIR Attack Spell, during Step 5 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Armour”.
4.9.23.
Strength
4.9.23.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece casts an EARTH Spell, during Step 4 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Critical Hit. When this Game Piece is the target of an EARTH Attack Spell, during Step 5 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Armour”.
4.9.24.
Intelligence
4.9.24.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece casts a FIRE Spell, during Step 4 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Critical Hit. When this Game Piece is the target of a FIRE Attack Spell, during Step 5 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Armour”.
4.9.25.
Wisdom
4.9.25.a.
This Power means: “When this Krosmaster KO’s an opposing Krosmaster with the Boss trait, you win one additional GG. When an opposing Krosmaster with the Boss trait KO’s this Krosmaster, your opponent wins one additional GG”.
4.9.26.
Prospecting
4.9.26.a.
This Power means: “When one of your Krosmasters KO’s an opposing Krosmaster, take one Kama from the reserve and add it to your stock”.
4.9.27.
Crafter
4.9.27.a.
This Power means: “The first time this Krosmaster buys a Demonic Reward during their Activation Phase, he does not have to spend any AP, a JADE Demonic Reward costs 5 Kamas, a SILVER Reward costs 7 Kamas, a GOLD Demonic Reward costs 10 Kamas and a RUBY Demonic Reward costs 15 Kamas (the GRANITE Demonic Reward still costs 3 Kamas)”.
4.9.28.
Farmer
4.9.28.a.
This Power means: “At the end of the turn of this Krosmaster, if this Krosmaster picked up at least 1 Kama during this turn, take 1 Kama from the reserve and add it to your stock”.
4.9.29.
Loot X
4.9.29.a.
This Power means: “If one of your Game Pieces KO’s an opposing Game Piece with this Power, take X Kamas from the reserve and add them to your stock”.
4.9.3.
Critical Hit
4.9.3.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece casts a Spell, during Step 4 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Critical Hit”.
4.9.30.
Wear
4.9.30.a.
This power means: “At the beginning of its summoner’s turn, this summon suffers 1 Injury.“.
4.9.31.
Profanation
4.9.31.a.
This power means: “Each time a Krosmaster is moved on the unit owning this power, put an Injury Token on the unit owning this power. Furthermore, Injury Token can’t be placed on or removed from the unit owning this power, except with the power «Profanation».”
4.9.4.
Armour
4.9.4.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece is the target of an Attack Spell, during Step 5 of the Spellcasting procedure, roll one additional die when Rolling for Armour”.
4.9.5.
Lock
4.9.5.a.
This Power means: “During Step 2 of the Block procedure, roll 2 dice instead of 1 when this Game Piece Rolls for Lock”. See 3.10.2.b.
4.9.6.
Dodge
4.9.6.a.
This Power means: “During Step 3 of the Block procedure, roll 2 dice instead of 1 when this Game Piece Rolls for Dodge”. See 3.10.2.c.
4.9.7.
Resistance WATER
4.9.7.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece is the target of a WATER Attack Spell, during Step 6 of the Spellcasting procedure, Damage inflicted by the WATER Spell to this Game Piece are decreased by 1”.
4.9.8.
Resistance AIR
4.9.8.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece is the target of an AIR Attack Spell, during Step 6 of the Spellcasting procedure, Damage inflicted by the AIR Spell to this Game Piece are decreased by 1”.
4.9.9.
Resistance EARTH
4.9.9.a.
This Power means: “When this Game Piece is the target of an EARTH Attack Spell, during Step 6 of the Spellcasting procedure, Damage inflicted by the EARTH Spell to this Game Piece are decreased by 1”.
4.10.
HP, Damage, Injuries, Heal and KO
4.10.1.
A Unit’s HP represents the amount of Injuries the Game Piece can sustain. A unit is never able to have more Injury Tokens on his card than its HP value.
4.10.2.
A Unit who receives an amount of Injuries equal to its HP is KO’ed.
This condition is checked continuously.
4.10.2.a.
When a Game Piece is KO’d, the following steps are applied in this order :
  • This Game Piece’s opponent take GG’s equal to the level of the Game Piece KO’d.
  • Non-Injury markers are removed from the KO’d Game Piece.
  • Demonic Rewards are removed from the KO’d Game Piece without revealing them.
  • The KO’d Game Piece is removed from the arena.
  • Summons placed by the KO’d Game Piece are removed from the arena.
  • Injury markers are removed from the Game Piece.
4.10.2.b.
A KO’d Krosmaster is not removed from the timeline.
4.10.3.
An Attack Spell deals Damage. The Base Damage of a Spell is printed on the Spell bar. There are two types of Damage: Elemental Damage and Neutral Damage. The type of Damage is indicated by the background color of the disk indicating the Base Damage of the Spell: blue for water, violet for air, orange for fire and green for earth.
4.10.3.a.
An Attack Spell associated with the Water, Air, Earth or Fire Element is an Elemental Spell. Damage inflicted by an Elemental Spell is Elemental Damage. By extension, these Spells are respectively described as Water, Air, Earth or Fire Spells.
4.10.3.b.
Some Attack Spells are not associated with an Element. These are Neutral Spells, and they deal Neutral Damage. It is never possible to roll more than one dice when rolling for Critical Hit with a Neutral Spell.
4.10.4.
At the end of the resolution of a Spell, after rolling for Critical Hit and Armour, the target of the Attack Spell receives an amount of Injuries equal to the amount of Damage inflicted by the Spell, within the limits of his HP. For each Injury received, placed an Injury token on that character’s card. A character is KO’ed as soon as he receives an amount of Injury tokens equal to his HP. Damage in excess of his HP are lost and are not considered as being inflicted.

Example: Oscar Kass (10HP, 2 Injuries) casts Con on Bill Tell (6HP, 5 Injuries). Con is a Spell that Steals Health. Thanks to a Critical Hit, Con deals 2 Damage to Bill Tell. A first Injury marker is placed on Bill Tell, who is then immediately KO’ed. The second Injury is lost. A single Injury marker is removed from Oscar Kass’s card.

4.10.5.
A Healing Spell deals no Damage, but removed Injury tokens to the target of the Spell instead. The target of a Healing Spell never rolls for Armour. A Healing Spell may never remove more Injury tokens than the amount of Injury tokens present on the target’s card. Heal in excess of the Injury tokens are lost and are not considered as being received.

Example: Merkator (17HP, 1 Injury) casts his Spell Foggone Conclusion and Rolls a Critical Hit. Foggone Conclusion should Heal 2 Injuries from Merkator. A first Injury marker is removed from Merkator. Since there are no more Injury markers on Merkator, the second point of Heal is lost, and Merkator is only Healed of 1 Injury.

4.10.6.
To place an Injury is equivalent to take an Injury marker from the stock, and to place it on a Game Piece.
4.10.6.a.
All Injuries placed on a Game Piece are considered suffered or received by this Game Piece, except Injuries placed to pay the cost of a spell.
4.10.6.b.
Each Injuries are further considered as inflicted by a Source. This source, unless specified otherwise, is the unit owning the Spell, or the Power at the origin of the injuries.

Example: Naz Rael inflicts Injuries with “Claw Attack” because the power mentions that it is Naz Rael who causes the injuries. He would trigger the power “Rolbak” by rolling a lock roll against a Count Frigost.

Example: Injuries placed by Dark Vlad’s “Iopinism” are inflicted by Dark Vlad even if its power doesn’t specify that’s the case.

4.10.6.c.
Injuries placed by the cost of a spell are neither considered inflicted nor suffered.
4.10.7.
When an exchange of Injuries occurs, those Injuries are not considered to be placed, but moved. As a consequence, those Injuries are neither considered inflicted nor suffered.

Example: “Krobust” from Merkator will not limit the number of Injuries exchanged by Djaul’s attack.

4.10.8.
A Game Piece cannot have more Injury markers than its HP stat. If it should receive or possess an exceeding amount of Injury markers, this excess is not applied to the Game Piece and simply put back in the stock.
4.11.
AP, MP, AP tokens, MP tokens
4.11.1.
All the Krosmasters and most of the Summons have AP and MP characteristics. The numbers printed on the Krosmaster’s card or on the back of the Summon token are his MAX AP and MAX MP.
4.11.1.a.
If a unit has a dash instead of a numerical value in its MP characteristic, then it hasn’t a MP gauge. MP modifications doesn’t affect it, whether they are immediate or given as tokens.
4.11.1.b.
If a unit has a dash instead of a numerical value in its AP characteristic, then it hasn’t a AP gauge. AP modifications doesn’t affect it, whether they are immediate or given as tokens.
4.11.2.
During his Activation Phase, a Krosmaster or a Summon fills a virtual gauge with as many AP as his AP characteristic, and another virtual gauge with as many MP as his MP characteristic. The AP MAX and MP MAX values printed on the Krosmaster’s card may be modified, especially by Demonic Rewards.
4.11.3.
When a Krosmaster or a Summon has to spend AP or MP, he spends them from these gauges. When the AP gauge is empty, it is not possible to spend AP anymore. When the MP gauge is empty, it is not possible to spend MP anymore. If AP or MP are left in the AP or MP gauges at the end of a Krosmaster’s or Summon’s turn, these AP or MP are lost: both gauges are emptied at the end of the turn.
4.11.4.
Some effects will offer an immediate gain or a loss of AP and/or MP. In that case, this gain or this loss can only happen if the unit on which it applies is the active unit.
4.11.5.
+1/-1 AP and +1/-1 MP tokens are used to represent temporary modifications of the AP MAX and MP MAX values of a character. A character that starts his Activation Phase with one or more of these tokens sees his AP MAX and MP MAX characteristics modified for the rest of the turn.
4.11.5.a.
At the start of his Activation Phase, the AP gauge of a character is filled up to his AP MAX characteristic, modified by the +1AP or -1AP tokens present on his character’s card (or token, for Summons). These tokens are then discarded.
4.11.5.b.
At the start of his Activation Phase, the MP gauge of a character is filled up to his MP MAX characteristic, modified by the +1MP or -1MP tokens present on his character’s card (or token, for Summons). These tokens are then discarded.
4.11.6.
A game piece that does not have an AP MAX characteristic may not receive +1AP or -1AP tokens. A game piece that does not have a MP MAX characteristic may not receive +1MP or -1MP tokens.
4.11.7.
A character may not receive more -1AP tokens than his AP MAX characteristic. A character may not receive more -1MP tokens than his MP MAX characteristic.
4.11.8.
A +1AP tokens cancels a -1AP token, and conversely. This cancellation happens once the marker is placed: remove both markers at this time.
In the end, a character can only have either +1AP tokens or -1AP tokens or no +1/-1AP tokens at all. A +1MP tokens cancels a -1MP token, and conversely. This cancellation happens once the marker is placed: remove both markers at this time. In the end, a character can only have either +1MP tokens or -1MP tokens or no +1/-1MP tokens at all.
4.11.9.
With its MP, a character can move from cell to cell. By spending 1 MP, the active character can move to an adjacent free cell.A character benefits of all its MP each turn
4.12.
Range tokens
4.12.1.
During its Activation phase, a Unit must add its Range tokens to determine their range modification value. These markers are then discarded, and until the end of turn, all spells from this unit with alterable range are affected by this value.

Example: Lilotte has a +1 Range marker on her at the beginning of the turn. During the Activation phase, this marker is removed and all of her spells with alterable range have +1 max range until the end of turn.

4.13.
Special markers
4.13.1.
Some Krosmasters are able to put special markers on a Krosmaster.
The special markers are always named specifically in the text of the Spell or Power. There can be only one marker with the same name in play per team.

Example: Puny Vampire has the spell “Certain Death” which puts a “Bleeding” marker on the targeted Krosmaster.

4.13.2.
Each Krosmaster can only apply a single special marker at a time. If a spell demands to put a special marker on a Krosmaster, then this marker is put on this Krosmaster, even if it was already placed on another Krosmaster. A player cannot remove a marker that he hasn’t placed himself.

Example: Puny Vampire uses his “Certain Death” spell on an opposing Queen of the Tofus. If on the next turn, the Puny Vampire uses his spell again on an opposing, Yugo, the “Bleeding” marker is removed from the Queen of the Tofus and placed on Yugo.

4.13.3.
When a Krosmaster is KO’d, all special markers he has put on other units are removed at the same time as AP, MP and Range markers.
4.13.4.
A special marker has no effect by itself, but is usually used as a reminder for an Effect a Krosmaster possess.

Example: If the Puny Vampire is adjacent to an opposing Malee Burhrum,even if Malee has a Bleeding marker on her, she will be able to heal herself. As the Puny Vampire as temporarily no powers, the Bleeding marker has no effect.

4.14.
Block, Lock and Dodge
4.14.1.
When a character wishes to spend 1MP to leave a cell adjacent to one or more enemies (also known as disengaging or quitting close combat), one or more Blocks occur. Each enemy character adjacent to the active character who attempts to move tries to Lock it.
4.14.2.
The Block procedure is:
4.14.2.a.
Step 1​. The active player indicates the cell in which he wants to move his character. This character must have at least 1MP in its gauge, but is not moved yet.
4.14.2.a.
and continues its turn as normal.
4.14.2.b.
Step 2​. One of the enemy characters adjacent to the active character (the active player choses which one) makes a Lock roll and records the amount of successes. Each dice on the Lock side is considered as a success.
4.14.2.b.
and 4.12.2.c.
4.14.2.c.
Step 3​. The active character makes a Dodge roll and records the amount of successes. Each dice on the Dodge side is considered as a success.
4.14.2.d.
Step 4​. Compare results to determine the state of the active player Locked : If the Lock Roll has more successes than the Dodge Roll, the active character is Locked: it loses immediately 3 MP and 3 AP.
Caught : If the Lock Roll has exactly as many successes as the Dodge Roll, the active character is only Caught: they immediately lose 1 MP and AP.
4.14.2.e.
Step 5​. For each enemy character adjacent to the active character and who has not yet made a Lock roll, repeat Steps
4.14.2.f.
Step 6​. If the character still has at least 1 MP in its gauge, itis moved to the cell that was indicated by the active player in
4.14.3.
A character who suffers the “Locked” result from a summon at point 4.14.2.d suffers the “Caught” result instead.
4.14.4.
Suffering from a succesful Block does not end the turn of the active character.
4.14.5.
A character with the Lock Power rolls one additional dice during the Lock roll performed in 4.14.2.b.
4.14.6.
A character with the Dodge Power rolls one additional dice during the Dodge roll performed in 4.14.2.c.
4.14.7.
A character with the Itty-Bitty Power ignores the Block rules.
4.15.
Range and Lines of Sight
4.15.1.
The Range of a Spell represents the distance at which a character must be from the caster of the Spell, counting only using adjacent cells (diagonals do not count), to become a legal target of the Spell. A Spell may have a Fixed Range, or a Minimal Range (MIN Range) and a Maximum Range (MAX Range). This Range is indicated in the Spell bar.
4.15.2.
A Spell whose Range is represented by fist-shaped icon is called a Close Combat Spell. This Spell has a Range of 1 that cannot be modified: it can only target a cell that is adjacent to the caster of the Spell. A Close Combat Spell has no MIN Range and no MAX Range.

Example: Oscar Kass’s Spell Con is a close combat spell; it has a range of 1, and cannot be increase.

4.15.3.
A Spell whose Range is represented by a target-shaped icon is a Ranged Spell. The two numbers visible under the icon represent its MIN Range and its MAX Range: the Spell can only target a cell located a number of cells away between these two numbers.

Example: Oscar Kass’s Deviousness Spell is a Ranged Spell with MIN Range 2 and MAX Range 3. This Spell cannot target a cell adjacent to Oscar Kass, or a cell located more than 4 cells away from Oscar Kass.

4.15.4.
A Spell whose Range is represented by an arrow-shaped icon is a Line Attack Spell. The two numbers visible under the icon represent its MIN Range and its MAX Range: the Spell can only target a cell located a number of cells away between these two numbers, on the same row (line or column) as the caster of the Spell.

Example: Anna Tommy’s Assault Spell is a Line Attack Spell with MIN Range 1 and MAX Range 2. This Spell cannot target a cell located on a diagonal from Anna Tommy.

4.15.5.
A Spell whose Range is represented by a cross-shaped icon is a Spell without Line of Sight. The two numbers visible under the icon represent its MIN Range and its MAX Range: the Spell can only target a cell located a number of cells away between these two numbers.
Furthermore, this Spell ignores the Lines of Sight.

Example: Count Harebourg’s Oscillation Spell is a Spell without Line of Sight. It can be cast on any Spell within range, ignoring the Lines of Sight.

4.15.6.
A Spell whose Range is represented by a blue oval icon is a Personal Spell. The cell where is located the game piece that casts a Personal Spell is the only legal target for the Spell. A Personal Spell has no MIN Range and no MAX Range.

Example: Merkator’s Foggone Conclusion Spell is a Personal Spell. It can only be cast targeted the cell where Merkator is located.

4.15.7.
A Spell whose Range icon is in green color is a Spell with alterable Range. Its MAX Range can be increased or diminished. A Spell whose Range icon is in red color is a Spell with a non-alterable Range. Its MAX Range cannot be increased or diminished.

Example: Anna Tommy’s Assault Spell is a Spell with a non-alterable Range. Oscar Kass’s Deviousness Spell is a Spell with alterable Range; its MAX Range can be increased or decreased.

4.15.8.
Krosmasters, summons with the Obstructive power and some pieces of scenery prevent the characters to see all the cells of the arena. A Game Piece can only target a cell if it has a Line of Sight towards this cell.
4.15.9.
A Game Piece is considered as having a Line of Sight towards a given cell if it is possible to draw an imaginary line from the center of the cell on which the character is standing to the center of the given cell, without this imaginary line cutting any cell containing a game piece blocking Lines of Sight.
4.15.9.a.
Cells occupied by a Krosmaster, a summon with the Obstructive power or a Tree block Lines of Sight.
4.15.9.b.
Free Cells, Cells occupied by a Bush or a Crate, and Cells occupied by a character with the Itty-Bitty Power do not block Lines of Sight. Itty-Bitty is an exception to Rule 3.11.9.a.
4.16.
Areas of Effect
4.16.1.
Some Spells affect more than one cell: these are Spells with an Area of Effect. The target for a Spell with an Area of Effect is determined normally: it is called the main target of the Spell. All the other potential targets located inside the Area of Effect of the Spell become additional targets.
4.16.2.
The main target and the additional targets are all affected in the same way. Dice are only rolled once for Critical Hit, and the result is used for all the targets of the Spell. However, each target makes a separate Armour roll.
4.16.3.
There are multiple Areas of Effect, based on the position of the game piece casting the Spell and the orientation of its Attack.
● Cross Area of Effect​. The 4 cells adjacent to the targeted cell are included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Square Area of Effect​. The 4 cells around the targeted cell (4 adjacent cells, 4 diagonals) are included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Hammer Area of Effect​. The 3 cells “in T” around the targeted cell are included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Staff Area of Effect​. The 2 adjacent cells “on the left” and “on the right” of the targeted cell are included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Shovel Area of Effect​. The adjacent cell “behind” the targeted cell is included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Hand Area of Effect​. The 2 adjacent cells “behind” the targeted cell are included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Breath Area of Effect​. The 3 cells “in a cone behind” the targeted cell are included in the Area of Effect of the Spell.
● Multiple targets​. Once the targeted cell is selected, every other cell that could have been targeted are included in the Area of effect of the spell.
4.16.4.
By default, a Spell targets a single cell only. If a Spell has a specific Area of Effect, this Area of Effect is mentioned in the text box of the Spell bar.

Example: Amalia’s Spell Defensive Brambles has a Cross Area of Effect.

4.16.4.a.
An Area of Effect is not considered as an additional effect of the Spell.
4.17.
Cells and Scenery
4.17.1.
The board is made up of cells. These cells are organized in rows and columns.
4.17.2.
Two cells are said adjacent when they have a side in common. A character can only move from the cell he is standing on towards an adjacent cell.
4.17.3.
A cell that contains no Tree, Bush or character is called a free cell. A free cell can also be called an empty cell. These two terms are synonymous. A character can only move towards a free cell.
4.17.4.
A cell that contains an obstacle is called an Impassable cell. It is impossible to move towards that cell. The characters, Trees, Bushes and some Summons are obstacles.
4.17.5.
The Scenery is placed in the arena before starting the game. Pieces of Scenery are not characters, they do not have HP. Unless otherwise stated, pieces of Scenery have the Unfazed Power. For the classic board, there are three types of Scenery: the Bushes, Trees and Crates.
4.17.5.a.
A Bush is an Impassable obstacle that does not block the Lines of Sight.
4.17.5.b.
A Tree is an Impassable obstacle that blocks the Lines of Sight.
4.17.5.c.
A Crate does not block the Lines of Sight. A cell that contains a Crate is considered as a Free cell. If a character is standing on a Crate, the MAX Range of all his Spells with alterable Range is increased by 1.

Example: Oscar Kass is standing on a Crate. His Deviousness Spell has a MIN Range of 2 and a MAX Range of 4.

4.18.
Effects
4.18.1.
An Effect is what is produced by the application of the text of a Spell, or the text of a Power. Some Effects may be produced by other effects.
4.18.2.
Effects may have some loose formulations. In these cases, the following rules apply.
4.18.2.a.
If an effect refers to the first time an event happens without any other context of time, it refers to the first time it happened during the fight.

Example: The power “Shadow of the jungle” of Darkli Moon can only trigger once per fight. On the contrary, the power “Laid Low” from the Monks can trigger at each of the player’s turn as a specific time context (“During your turn”) is established.

4.18.2.b.
If an effect refers to another event, it refers to an event that happened during the current turn of the active character, unless specified otherwise.

Example: to check if Remington Smisse’s power “Shushus a-Gogo” heals him, we only take the Injuries he inflicted during his turn into account. So, inflicting an Injury during the first turn of the game won’t guarantee that he will be healed every turn afterwards.

4.18.2.c.
If an effect refers to a adjacent cell or unit, it refers to a cell or unit adjacent to the active character, unless specified otherwise.

Example: When the Nun casts her “Fatebook” spell, she can select an ally adjacent to herself to apply the effect.

4.18.2.d.
If an effect refers to an allied or opposing unit, the subjectivity of the effect is always the one of the player controlling the effect, unless specified otherwise.

Example: The Monks power “Laid Low” only triggers when a opposing Krosmaster (to the player controlling the Monk owning this power) is KOd during this player’s turn.

4.18.3.
When a Spell is cast, or when a Power or Effect is triggered, it can create one or more punctual Effects.
4.18.3.a.
A punctual effect must be resolved to have an impact on the game. Sometimes, the effect cannot be resolved immediately or must be resolved later. In these cases, the effect is put on standby.

Example: the additional effect of spell “Pierces armor” is created during step 3, but cannot be resolved until step 5.

4.18.3.b.
When two punctual effects should be resolved simultaneously or during the same step, both are put on standby, and the active player select in which order they are resolved. The only exception to this this rule happens during step 3: the additional effects of spell are resolved in the order printed on the card.
4.18.3.c.
A punctual effect on standy will not be resolved if the Power which it came from is lost by the game piece who owns it.

Example: Yugo – Young King suffer enough Injuries to lose his Counter power. Since this power is no longer owned by Yugo, its effect doesn’t trigger.

4.18.3.d.
The resolution of a punctual effect can apply a continuous effect on a game piece. Unless specified otherwise, the resolution of a punctual effect can only apply a continuous effect on a game piece currently on the board.

Example: Doo Rex uses his “Backlash” spell. He applies to himself a continuous effect until the end of the turn that increases the next “Backlash” damage by 1.

Example: Djaul’s power “Descendre Prank” triggers a punctual effect, at the beginning of the fight. The resolution of that effect applies a continuous effect on Djaul which reduces him to level 0.
That is why, even if his power is cancelled, the effect remains.

4.18.3.e.
When a pucntual effects demands to make a choice during its resolution, this choice is made without checking if the effect can be applied or not.

Example: The Nun uses her “Fatebook” spell with an ally owning the “Unfazed” power adjacent to her. When the spell resolves, the player can choose this ally for the displacing effect of the spell. The effect will place a Tombstone into play, then, since the ally is Unfazed, it will not be moved at all.

4.18.4.
A continuous effect applies on one or more game pieces on the field (unless specified otherwise). A continuous effect can be applied by the presence of a power, or by the resolution of a punctual effect for a specified or unspecified duration.
4.18.4.a.
Some powers generate continous effects, which are called continuous static effects. “Armor” or “Stain” are examples of powers generating continuous static effects.
4.18.4.b.
Units affected by a continuous effect are determined when this effect starts, if that effect alters units. This rule does not apply on continuous static effects.

Example: Buck Anear casts his spell “Turt Hell”. This effect alters units, therefore, if later during the same turn, a allied Summon is put into the game, it will not gain the “Immune” power.

4.18.4.c.
Continuous effects that do not alter units alters the rules of the game themselves. They can be applied to units that were not affected when the continuous effect started.
4.18.4.d.
When a game piece comes into play, continuous effects which could be applied on that game piece are applied before any punctual effect resolution.
4.18.4.e.
Whenever the conditions required by a continuous effect are met, the effect is instantly applied.
4.18.4.f.
Whenever a power is gained, the continuous effect is instantly applied.
4.18.4.g.
When it comes to the application of continuous effects, the loss of power have priority over any other continuous effects.

Example: Kriss Krass targets a Krosmaster with his “Fraud” spell.
When this spell is resolved, “Fraud” applies a continuous effect on the target that makes it loses all of his powers. If the target is or become adjacent to Doo Rex, it will not gain any elemental resistance from “Feca Shield”, because the loss of powers effect has priority over the bonus given by “Feca Shield”.

4.18.5.
If an effect tries to apply something impossible to resolve, it will still apply as much of this effect as possible.

Example: The spell has “Pushes back 2 cells”. If there is an obstacle 2 cells behind the target, the spell will still push the target back 1 cell.

4.18.6.
Effects apply only on game pieces that are currently in play, unless specified otherwise.
4.18.7.
Powers or Additional Effects of Spells that refer to the name of the card it is printed on only refer to that card, and not to other cards with the same name.
4.18.8.
If a power is copied, each reference to the name of the game piece owning the original power is replaced by the name of the Game Piece using the copy.

Example : When Darkness Knight copies an allied Grougaloragran’s power, Darkness Knight gains all types from all Krosmasters in play.

4.18.9.
If a power or Additional Effect of a Spell mention something else (Name or Type) than the Game Piece’s name which owns that Power or Spell, it refers to all Krosmasters or summons with that type and all summons with that name.

Example: King of the Gobballs “Gobbolob” attack inflicts +2 damage if there is at least one GOBBALL adjacent to the target of the spell. This attack is reinforced if a Gobball (the summoned mob) – even an opposing one – is adjacent to the target, but also if the Royal Gobball (which has the Gobball type) is adjacent to the target.

4.19.
Summoning, Summoning Spell, Summons tokens
4.19.1.
A Summon is usually brought to the game by a Krosmaster using a Summoning Spell; it is represented by a token whose characteristics are printed on the back.
4.19.1.a.
A summon can only be summoned on a free cell.
4.19.1.b.
A summon can only be summoned on a cell that contains no other unit.
4.19.1.c.
A summon has no level, and doesn’t reward the player with GG when it is KO’d.
4.19.1.d.
There are two types of summons: Mobs and Mechanisms.
4.19.1.e.
A summon without a MP stat belongs to the Mechanisms category. By this definition, Bombs, Traps, Turrets, Kokonuts and Immature Dreggons are examples of units that are mechanisms..
4.19.1.f.
A summon doesn’t block the line of sight unless it has the Obstructive power.
4.19.1.g.
A summon is inserted in the Timeline and takes its turn just after the character who Summoned it. If a character puts in play several summon tokens, the active player chooses the order in which they play after the turn of this character.
4.19.2.
Summons can be part of a family. When a summons belongs in a family, it is considered to have a Type corresponding to the name of that family. Here is an exhaustive list of existing families and the summons belonging to them.
4.19.2.a.
Bomb family: Water Bomb, Grenado, Firebomb
4.19.2.b.
Trap Family: Lethal Trap, Tricky Trap
4.19.2.c.
Turret Family: Harpooner, Tacturret, Lifesaver
4.19.2.d.
Sinistro Family: Bubotron
4.19.2.e.
Gobbal Family : Gobbal
4.19.2.f.
Tofu Family : Tofu
4.19.2.g.
Atooin Family : Donatella, Léonardawa, Raphaela, Michelangela
4.19.3.
A Summon is represented by a token. This token may be replaced by an actual representation of the Summon (for example, using a figurine). This representation keeps the same characteristics as the token.
4.19.4.
Mobs are characters. Mob Summons have HP, usually also have AP, MP and a Spell, and sometimes also have Powers.
4.19.4.a.
A Mob does not block the Lines of Sight.
4.19.4.b.
A Mob can only spend its AP and MP to move and cast its Spells.
A Mob cannot pick up Kamas on the board or buy Demonic Rewards.
4.19.4.c.
A Mob is an obstacle; the cell it occupies is Impassable.
4.19.5.
A Bomb is a mechanism. This Summoned Mechanism has 1HP. Each Bomb has the Explosion Spell it casts when it is KO’ed.
4.19.5.a.
A Bomb cannot Lock characters since it is not a character itself.
4.19.5.b.
A Bomb is an obstacle; the cell it occupies is Impassable.
4.19.5.c.
At the beginning of the turn of the character who Summoned it, a Bomb automatically suffers 1 Damage and therefore casts its Explosion spell, since it's been KO’ed.
4.19.5.d.
The Explosion Spell is a Personal Spell that targets the cell occupied by the Bomb, and also affects all additional targets in a Square Area of Effect around the Bomb (thus, not only the Bomb itself).
4.19.6.
A Turret is a mechanism. This Summoned Mechanism has a HP characteristic (the amount depends on the Turret). Each Turret also has a Spell.
4.19.6.a.
A Turret cannot Lock characters since it is not a character itself.
4.19.6.b.
A Turret is an obstacle; the cell it occupies is Impassable.
4.19.7.
A Trap is a mechanism. This Summon Mechanism does not have an HP characteristics. Each Trap has a Click Spell it casts when a character occupies its cell.
4.19.7.a.
A Trap cannot Lock characters since it is not a character itself.
4.19.7.b.
A Trap is not an obstacle, the cell is occupies is a Free cell.
4.19.7.c.
A Trap casts its Click Spell if:
  • A character moves on its cell.
  • A character is moved on its cell by the additional effect of a Spell and ends this special move exactly on the Trap.
  • A Mob is directly Summoned on the Trap.
4.19.7.d.
A Trap does not cast its Click Spell if:
  • A character is moved on its cell by the additional effect of a Spell but does not end this special move exactly on the Trap.
  • A Bomb is Summoned on the Trap (a Bomb is not a character).

Example: Oscar Kass is adjacent to a Trap, “in front of” the Trap. Luk Ylook targets Oscar Kass with his Repelling Arrow Spell (Pushes Back 2 cells) and places Oscar Kass “behind” the Trap. Since Oscar Kass did not end its move on the Trap, the Trap does not cast its Click Spell.

4.19.7.e.
A Trap is removed from the arena after casting its Click Spell.
4.19.8.
Tombstones are mechanisms.
4.19.8.a.
A Tombstone cannot Lock characters since it is not a character itself.
4.19.8.b.
A Tombstone is not an obstacle, the cell is occupies is a Free cell.
4.19.8.c.
Tomsbtones all have the Profanation power. This power means: “Each time a Krosmaster is moved on the unit owning this power, put an Injury Token on the unit owning this power. Furthermore, Injury Token can’t be placed on or removed from the unit owning this power, except with the power «Profanation».”
4.19.9.
A Summon Spell is usually a Special spell, but can be an Attack or Healing spell. As all Spells, it has a Name, but in this particular case the name is followed by a number in brackets.
4.19.9.a.
A Summon Spell can only put summons into play, and therefore never refers to a Krosmaster.

Exemple: The “Summon Gobball” spell from the King of the Gobballs cannot put a Royal Gobball into play because it is a Krosmaster, even if it has the Gobball type.

4.19.9.b.
Each Summon Spell summons a number of tokens as described in the spell effect, regardless of the number between brackets.
4.19.9.c.
A Summon spell has a number in brackets in its name, which is called the Summons control value. A Krosmaster cannot put a summon into play if there’s already as many allied summons into play as that number. If an effect puts one or more summons into play, the effect puts as many summons as possible into play without exceeding the Summons control value of this spell.

Example: You play Elogio and Black Crow in your Team. If you already have a Crackstone and a Crobak into play, Elogio cannot summon another Crackstone (as his limit is 2), but the Black Crow can summon another Crobak..

Example: The Black Crow has the spell “Crobak Nosedive (3)” which is an Attack Summon spell. He can target and deal damage with this spell even if he already has 3 Crobak in play; however, when he does so, no new Crobak will be summoned, as it would exceed the Summons Control value.

4.19.9.d.
Summons that have been removed from the arena can be Summoned again if the Summons control value is not reached.

Example: The Queen of the Tofus controls 3 Tofus. She cannot Summon another one using her Summon Tofu (3) Spell. During his turn, the opposing player KO’s a Tofu, which is removed from the arena. The Queen of the Tofus can now cast her Summon Tofu (3) Spell again.

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